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User: John Needham

If you want to type faster, turn off the 60-second timer by clicking on it. The timer is good until you reach like 60 WPM to help you learn to pace yourself, but after that, you need to learn to keep your eyes on the words and your mind on the rhythm of your fingers. Soon, you will know by the rhythm if you're typing at 60, 70, 80, 90, or 100 WPM. Around every 10 WPM is the difference where you feel a noticeable difference in rhythm, very similarly to how around 10 degrees is where you notice a change in temperature. Also, I might say something about the Dvorak keyboard after the suffering I endured to get great at it before switching back to QWERTY. If your hands never get too uncomfortably tired typing QWERTY, you shouldn't change to a Dvorak keyboard layout. Just stick with QWERTY because it's basically as awesome: I've typed Dvorak and QWERTY both at 80 WPM. But I've permanently switched back to QWERTY because it's not a huge difference in comfort and effort, just as fast, and definitely more convenient. Having to rebind your keys and shortcuts in tons of programs quickly gets super annoying. If I was developing carpal tunnel, I would look into ergonomics, a Kinesis Advantage keyboard, keyboard macros and auto-complete scripts, rehabilitation, weight lifting, dictation software, and OCR software first. Today, dictation software can easily and accurately do 100-200 WPM speeds. Many people with strong hands can type all day in QWERTY and their hands rarely get tired. Switching will frustrate you to tears if you can't stand going from 80 WPM to 5 WPM for a couple days. Think about it: 5 W... P... M. Practice should get anyone to 100 WPM in QWERTY or Dvorak with an hour of practice everyday on Typeracer and 10FastFingers consistently for around six months to one year. Genetics will start to play heavily into accuracy and speed from 100-200 WPM. Less typing distance DOES NOT mean Dvorak is faster than QWERTY because of other things that slow down and balance out that advantage for Dvorak: timing issues from favoring weaker and less coordinated fingers more often, differences in opportunities for pre-positioning of fingers and hands, higher hand alternation rates vs faster single-handed key combos. And some of it depends on your personality too. You use your strong index and middle fingers a lot more in QWERTY, so you can "attack" your keyboard more as these fingers have to move faster to do the same amount of typing. This gives QWERTY a more athletic, aggressive feel, and Dvorak a more effortless, relaxed feel. If you're the type of person who likes action, you might enjoy QWERTY more. I don't recommend typing too hard, so you don't beat up your fingers, but if you're feeling stressed, energized, or aggressive, you can murder your keyboard more with your strong fingers that are used much more in QWERTY.
User details
User ID 1482921
last login 4 hours, 29 minutes ago
member since 11 months, 2 weeks, 6 days ago
Keyboard Layout Qwerty-based
Keyboard Corsair Strafe (MX brown), Corsair white PBT double-shots, WASD blue o-rings, Bailey leather rest.
Words typed 148,463
Tests taken 2,435
Competitions taken 0 (0)
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